The Knitterly Hooker

Archive for the ‘designing’ Category

Pattern release: Instincts

In designing, knitting, portfolio, stash busting on May 25, 2017 at 6:26 pm


Instincts is an expression of authentic emotions conveyed by colors that are outside the scope of aesthetically coordinated hues. This fair-isle hat is simple, yet makes a bold statement.  Be bold in your color choices.

Pattern is available via my new website: www.theknitterlyhooker.com 

Ravelry Usernames

In designing, knitting on February 16, 2016 at 9:02 pm

Usernames are inherently a representation of us in the cyberworld and create a decided story about who you are even before any interaction.  I can’t say that I’ve been very good at developing usernames, and I think it’s so necessary now, particularly with branding oneself.

After being PinkCashmere1980 for so many years on Ravelry, I’m considering changing it.  It was only a few days ago in a Ravelry group chat, I actually explained the meaning behind my username here.  I discovered that there is actually a way to do it (you only have 3 shots) and I’m thinking about making that transition to theknitterlyhooker.

I feel like it’s super weird, but may be a necessary move. What do you think?  Is Ravelry actually a part of my branding, promotion opportunity? I guess when I begin designing  or whatever else I please, it might be right?

If you had the opportunity to change your Ravelry username would you??

Thoughts?

 

Knitting – in the New Year

In community challenges, designing, knitting, stash busting on January 1, 2015 at 12:08 pm

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I never made it to 12am. I never saw the ball drop on tv. What I did do though, is allow my eyes to be consumed by the weight of sleep. It was a beautiful thing! I dreamed of things I would do, the places I’d go and the person I’ll become.

What place will I have in the world and in the knitting community? I decided I would begin things right by finishing properly. I was charged to make a swatch, and when it was completed it was unbalanced. It needed a companion. So, I decided to convert the swatch to a wristband/cuff. The companion is what I worked on before I fell asleep.

On this new year’s day, I will finish the companion. This will be trend…to finish all what I have started, and also to make a social statement using knitting…now, won’t that be interesting?

This is a year of new things. Let’s do it!

TKH

How to get that “Creative Spark: Ruth E. Carter”

In community challenges, designing, finished projects, knitting on August 20, 2014 at 5:38 am

I rose up early to meet the sun at 4 am yesterday. I came across this video on my Facebook feed and I fell in love. I fell in love with the message and I felt inspired to be better and to do better at fulfilling my creative obligation. I pay attention, and even her work space was conducive to a productive workflow. I want to be just like her … Ruth E. Carter.

Creative Spark: Ruth E. Carter:

Hira is Here

In designing, finished projects, knitting, portfolio on August 9, 2014 at 12:00 am

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I am pleased to announce the pattern release for  my original design,Hira.

It is now available on Ravelry and on Etsy.

I’m offering a 10% discount using the code: HIRA7 (on Ravelry and on Etsy).

The code is good from 8/9/14 – 8/16/14

When you make it, I’d love to see it, so please #tkhknits on Instagram!

Design: Hira, the process

In designing, finished projects, knitting, portfolio, stash busting on July 27, 2014 at 10:18 pm

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I started designing Hira on July 1, 2014. Inspiration for the stitch pattern came from blanket square I donated to La Casita Yarn Shop Cafe, for which the final product would be donated to Warm Up America. This stitch pattern is called diagonal grain stitch. There was something wonderful about doing this stitch pattern and I decided to take it to another level.

Many ideas flooded my mind, but I decided on a cowl. Once that was decided on, the construction quickly came to me. I knew I wanted a hem, because previous experience told me that this stitch pattern curls like the dickens! I would have preferred to make this in the round, but making the calculations to do so did not come to me (Perhaps when you do it, you can tell me how), so I decided on a flat construction and obviously that means seaming is involved. I was up for that.

A yarn shop went out of business and I thought what better time to buy “good” yarn for this design. So I bought 4 skeins of a Lang Viviene, but in hindsight, I realize I should have purchased 5 or 6.

I’m not sure how other designers go through their drafting or pattern development process, but as I knit, I wrote out the pattern….VERY carefully. I took really good notes. As I mentioned in earlier posts though, I was knitting late at night and I was tired, so I often woke up to several mistakes; ripping back a few rows.  My process was also slowed by the heat and work obligations, but I pushed through with the a/c and leaving work early (read: on time).

As the design progressed, I became concerned at how wide it was. When I “tried it on” on the needles, I kinda liked that gathered neck look so I shifted gears to do some decreasing.  I decided that the decreasing should go in the stockinette portion of the top hem.  Why? Mainly because I’m not good at “decreasing in pattern” and I hate math and wasn’t trying to figure it out. That’s the absolute truth!

When I began using the 3rd skein, I became fearful, that there was not enough. The 4 skeins were used up rather quickly, and when it came to binding off, I barely made it. I had 4″ to spare! Obviously, there was not enough to tack down the top hem or seam period, so I improvised and used embroidery thread.  I absolutely loved seaming with the embroidery thread as there was barely any bulk.  I’ll definitely be using this more often.

I don’t normally bathe and block my pieces, but I decided it was best practice.  I used a capful of wash and a bucket of lukewarm/cool water.  I let the piece sit in that for about 20 minutes.  Here is when my heart jumped out my throat….I picked it up and this had become so humongous! I panicked.  I decided that it was going to work out and roll dried and pinned it for the blocking process.

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While pinning it down, I discovered, what I then thought would be the back, had a nice heart shaped detail. With all this heat, it surprisingly took 3 days to dry! It was so large, and I thought it could be an oversize cowl.  It works as an oversized cowl, but I thought I could do better.  So I played with my design and soon discovered that my heart shaped back was better as a front and the body shimmied nicely down over my shoulders; so a capelet Hira became.

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I was just so thankful that this design became a reality. I took about 3 hours taking photos and another 2 editing them. Just a few hours to type up the design…and this was done on one of the days Hira was drying .

I am content with my pattern and I hope you all enjoy it when it arrives!

Almost there

In designing, knitting, portfolio on July 15, 2014 at 7:19 pm

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Hira is my latest design; a cowl. There are only about 5″ left. There have been minor delays but more progression than not and I am pleased. I feel like a proud mama!

Proud mama will return to post upon successful completion of Hira.

Hurray!

Pause. Start. Repeat

In designing, knitting on July 6, 2014 at 1:45 pm

If you recall, I was working on a design. I haven’t spoken much about it. I paused it early June to pursue the summer and absorb all the sun I possibly can. In short, it was taking a bit longer than anticipated and I wanted something that I could put out almost right away. I mean there’s photography, writing out the pattern; stylize the piece and the paper. This takes time.

After I completed a square for a blanket to be donated, I was inspired by the stitch pattern I used.

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My mind took this stitch pattern and the ideas came to me…this being the first. This I started on July 1, 2014. I’m just praying I have enough yarn right now.

The process has been brutal. Though this is a simple stitch pattern, I have pulled this back several times and several rows back due to mistakes… Mistakes caused by knitting when I’m sleepy, only to wake up to a mess.

What is it? Ahh, you still gotta wait! (not as long as the first one I have paused momentarily.) Guesses?

This is the introduction of Hira.

Ten inches, ten facts

In designing, knitting, portfolio, stash busting on May 27, 2014 at 6:15 am

I made some head way and the first portion of my design, lovelies, is complete! Ten solid inches of a brainless fair-isle pattern; so simple and so perfect. I absolutely love it and feel like I am on that road to having my dream realized!

Although I’m not yet ready to reveal my design, at least not yet (though, a clue is on my Instagram page) , I am ready to share with you some fun facts about it! Is that cool?

1. Technique that is needed is kitchener in the round. I found this video and it.is.amazing!

2. Because there are fair-isle elements, I suggest these yarn bobbins I absolutely love them. I found these tools too late in my toolbox and I have a lot of ends to weave in. I have the small bobbins, but soon enough I’ll buy the larger ones.

3. Fair-isle requires weaving in ends because you constantly out of colors and I found a few videos to be super helpful to me.

4. There are stripes in this piece and I hate jogs. There are several great videos on YouTube.

5. I suggest aran weight or dk weight yarn for this project.

6. If I had to do this project again, I would maybe use a natural fiber yarn. I am not knocking what I am using though, Caron Simply Soft is really nice!

7. The item being designed is trendy(at least I think so) .

8. The item being designed will definitely require blocking to flatten out the stitches some.

9. In truth, I was afraid I was going to have to pay someone to finish my designed item if I didn’t find the kitchener in the round video.

10. This design begins with a provisional cast on.

Sew Perfect

In designing, knitting, sewing on May 4, 2014 at 7:59 am

I was just wondering to myself how to improve my sewing and better incorporate it in my knitting. I thought about my fall sweater Hettie, and the ribbon I placed on the buttonbands. I thought about this because although I love my sweater, I didn’t 100% love how I sewed on the ribbon trimming on the buttonbands. Because I love the aesthetic of the ribbon and I know I’ll be using it again, I wanted to know how to do it better. Behold the miracle of the internet and I found this blog with very clear instructions with very professional looking results. What I would do differently from this blogger/sewer extraordinaire did though, is probably put the ribbon on the wrong side of the button band instead of the right side, although I have seen sweaters withe ribbon the way demonstrated. I also found this great video tutorial.

I hope that you will consider this finishing touches on your handmade knits. Enjoy!